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An informational website for those injured or impacted by mesothelioma and asbestos

May 2016 Archives

Is Asbestos Use Legal in the United States?

Yes, asbestos is currently legal and used within products made in the United States. The Environmental Protection Agency worked to ban different asbestos-containing products in the early 1970s, but in 1991, most of the bans were overturned with the help of asbestos industry supporters.

Dyson Air Purifier Measures Air Quality of Rooms

If you or a family member has trouble with allergies or asthma, you have likely looked into an air purifier for your home. An air purifier removes contaminants from the air in the room, including dust, pollen, pet dander, and more. Dyson has created an air purifier that goes beyond removing the toxins; it measures and tracks your room's air quality and adjusts the airflow to keep pollution levels down.

3 Blue Collar Occupations That Can Lead to Mesothelioma

Some of those most at risk of developing mesothelioma in their lifetime are workers in "blue collar" positions. Blue collar workers are working class people who perform manual labor. Because these workers spent so much time around asbestos-containing materials and products, they are more likely to have experienced prolonged exposure to the substance, especially before it was declared a health hazard by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Women and Mesothelioma

We often talk about how men are at risk for developing mesothelioma in their lifetime because they were likely to suffer prolonged asbestos exposure at blue-collar jobs. In the 20th century, more men than women held positions such as an insulator, firefighter, or boilermaker, but that does not mean that women were 100% safe from asbestos.

Man Dumps Asbestos in Multiple Long Island Locations

Recently, a 42-year-old Long Island man pleaded guilty to dumping tons of contaminated construction debris in four different locations. The debris contained hazardous substances including asbestos and pesticides.